Ranthambhore in the Rains

Unlike some of the other places that I’ve lived in, where people see rain as an intrusion and a temporary inconvenience in their lives, Indians tend to celebrate rain, perhaps like no other nationality. The ominous darkening of the monsoon skies, the lashing winds and the heady smell of the earth as it gets pounded by meaty raindrops stirs most of us into a state of exhilaration & romance, a kind of temporary madness. To get soaking wet, to dance and play in this weather comes naturally to most of us.

Ranthambhore rainscape

The lush green Lahpur valley of Ranthambhore

For me this June was the very first time I got to experience the monsoon season in Ranthambhore. That Ranthambhore is a magical place any time of the year is a given. But dial into it the monsoon season, and it becomes one of nature’s greatest roller-coaster rides.

Tigers dancing, playing, stalking & hunting in the downpour, hiding and cowering from claps of thunder & lighting, the spectacular vistas covered in emerald green, cloaked by black thunderheads above, this was a first of its kind experience for me, even though from a photography-standpoint it wasn’t perfect. Leaky tarps, fogged lenses, poor light were constant challenges, but was it one of my best ever trips to Ranthambhore? You bet!

wet tiger stand up ©

A young tiger is looking for a way to escape from thunder & lighting

wet cub in the rain long shot ©

drenched

Wet cub copy ©

A huge clap of thunder makes her just cower under a tree, shaking with nervousness.

tigers rain dances 3 ©

playing tag in a downpur

tiger on wet ledge ©

now that I’m wet, there’s no point trying not to be..

tiger leap in the rain ©

propulsion

rain tiger thru the tree

A tiger at full speed is a sight to behold

reflection pool

mirror, mirror, on the ground..

tiger in the rain ©

my best shot of the trip

rain dance ©

here I come..

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Trees n’ Tigers

Tigers on trees panorama ©

trees & tiger cubs

Who says the leopard doesn’t change his spots? Sometimes he wears stripes!

The myth of the tiger, built over centuries through records of ancient documents, India’s Mughal and Colonial histories and reams of accounts from all kinds of tiger-hunters and watchers had left us with a classic stereotype of this animal which now seems to be up for scrutiny; That they are solitary, nocturnal… and don’t climb trees.

But tigers do climb trees. As youngsters or sub-adults, trees fascinate them and they are light enough at 230 kilos to go up and down them relatively easily. Trees are great for horseplay, sharpening their reflexes and their claws, and they are a perfect vantage point from where to survey their environment. Once they grow to full adulthood (close to 370 kilos), they get too heavy.

Thanks to India’s new love affair with wildlife photography and modern research technology, there is much more access and intrusion into the so called ‘secret life of tigers’today.

Ranthambhore, when explored as a virgin wildlife landscape in the 70s by the legendary Fateh Singh Rathore was a cluster of village fields and hutments and the tiger was a shy and secretive creature, seen occasionally and only at night.

Today tiger moms are strutting about in the open, with their offspring in tow, for hordes of long-lensed photographers and visitors. From the birth of the cubs till adulthood at around 2 years, they are raised in front of a house-full audience of people. This is happening in Ranthambhore, Bandhavgarh, Tadoba, Panna, and I believe even in Bandipur and Nagarhole.

From the miraculous glimpses of tigress ‘Noon’ with her new -born litter in the 80s to spending a full day with T19 and her cubs this year, tiger behavior seems to have come a long way. Perhaps tigers too, quite like the leopard, are rapidly adapting to the intense human presence that is constantly around them.

Tiger on a tree uncropped

Tiger sub-adult high up in a mango tree, in Bijrani, Corbett

two cubs in the big tree

Horseplay on the ‘jungle gym’

cub w butt up on tree

Awkward for tigers to come down trees because they are front-heavy.. opposite of the leopard.