Trees n’ Tigers

Tigers on trees panorama ©

trees & tiger cubs

Who says the leopard doesn’t change his spots? Sometimes he wears stripes!

The myth of the tiger, built over centuries through records of ancient documents, India’s Mughal and Colonial histories and reams of accounts from all kinds of tiger-hunters and watchers had left us with a classic stereotype of this animal which now seems to be up for scrutiny; That they are solitary, nocturnal… and don’t climb trees.

But tigers do climb trees. As youngsters or sub-adults, trees fascinate them and they are light enough at 230 kilos to go up and down them relatively easily. Trees are great for horseplay, sharpening their reflexes and their claws, and they are a perfect vantage point from where to survey their environment. Once they grow to full adulthood (close to 370 kilos), they get too heavy.

Thanks to India’s new love affair with wildlife photography and modern research technology, there is much more access and intrusion into the so called ‘secret life of tigers’today.

Ranthambhore, when explored as a virgin wildlife landscape in the 70s by the legendary Fateh Singh Rathore was a cluster of village fields and hutments and the tiger was a shy and secretive creature, seen occasionally and only at night.

Today tiger moms are strutting about in the open, with their offspring in tow, for hordes of long-lensed photographers and visitors. From the birth of the cubs till adulthood at around 2 years, they are raised in front of a house-full audience of people. This is happening in Ranthambhore, Bandhavgarh, Tadoba, Panna, and I believe even in Bandipur and Nagarhole.

From the miraculous glimpses of tigress ‘Noon’ with her new -born litter in the 80s to spending a full day with T19 and her cubs this year, tiger behavior seems to have come a long way. Perhaps tigers too, quite like the leopard, are rapidly adapting to the intense human presence that is constantly around them.

Tiger on a tree uncropped

Tiger sub-adult high up in a mango tree, in Bijrani, Corbett

two cubs in the big tree

Horseplay on the ‘jungle gym’

cub w butt up on tree

Awkward for tigers to come down trees because they are front-heavy.. opposite of the leopard.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Trees n’ Tigers

  1. Wonderfully enlightening!! Certainly the tiger’s adaption to the presence of humans and their vehicles is in some respects advantageous for research but maybe this familiarity encourages the tiger to encroach on land close to civilisation for hunting. This creates serious conflict. Anyway my thoughts!!!! The photos are absolutely superb and show the mammal like I have never seen before.

  2. Thanks Vivienne as always. Wise words and the dilemma is tragically real. Too many people in India/and on our planet for the sanctuaries to become anything more than glorified zoos or ‘enclosures’. Its like an evaporating droplet in the sand. Sadly just a matter of time and till them both wildlife and the master-species will need to live cheek to jowl

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s