Stalking Tiger, Hidden Wagon

T19 stalking

Stalking– Ranthambhore tigers have so adapted to local conditions that they often use the tourist jeeps as both, visual and audio cover to position themselves to make a successful kill. They are often seen slinking along close to a jeep hiding behind its profile, masking their sound by the sounds of the engine ( and yes, unfortunately also of the loud tourist )

It was therefore odd for me to see one of the most successful hunters in recent times, T19 aka Unnis, Krishna, Brat, stalk though a maze of burnt Dhonk trees. She stood out like a neon sign on a charcoal drawing! She was predictably unsuccessful but I was quite happy to get a few surreal pictures.

t19 thru the trees in dhonk ©

T19, moving through the burnt brush.

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Moving Stripes

tiger in motion panorama ©

                                                                            A composite frame of T19’s cubs in motion

Ranthambhore’s sambhar powered, all -terrain Hummer, 400 pounds of torque.. A turbo powered mac truck that can build incredible thrust in a split second and then turn on a dime.

A tiger in flowing motion is a thing of powerful beauty. I was fortunate to get a few grabs of T19’s sub adults frolicking in the open grasses that skirt Ranthambhore’s Rajbagh lake. I also got a few hundred out-of-focus bloopers which was tragic because the action was spectacular and a more accomplished photog would have done more justice to the moment
Since turning to photography I sometimes miss not worrying about the camera settings and just enjoying the fleeting moment for what it is.

cub charging ©

cub mustang pose copy ©cub full run copy©

fighting cubs 2 ©

sparring cubs 2 ©

two cubs wrestling copy ©

Some people talk to animals. Not many listen though. That’s the problem.

T19 returns to a joyous reception by her cub after an outing

T19 returns to a joyous reception by her cub after an outing

T19 3 cubs leaving jhalra ©

By accident rather than design, I have found myself in Ranthambhore almost every few months, these last couple of years. Also quite by chance, I ended up in the presence of a remarkable tigress who rules the prime real estate of this region. She perhaps is the first tigress who has raised 3 cubs from birth to sub- adulthood under the full glare of tourists, wildlife paparazzi & filmmakers and in the process, has given the world an expose´ on how tigers live and raise families. The secret life of a tiger is secret no more.

I have been an unwittingly lucky spectator to T-19’s family life over this period of time, thanks to Balendu Singh who triggered it all by calling me in sweltering June last year to ask if I was coming to see the new cubs. When I refused and told him that I would visit in October instead, he said “ Well, ok fine, but they wont be little cubs anymore in October”. I left for Ranthambhore very the next day.

Over this year and a half I have been witness to the most amazing acts of motherhood, protection, loving care, admonishment, training, fun and playfulness of this little group. At the risk of sounding anthropomorphic, her trials and tribulations, joys and sorrows, her determined investment in her progeny has been as human as human could be.

The sheer pleasure of being kissed by one of her cubs when she returns from an expedition, or the terrifying snarl which is admonishment to a cub who seemed prone to run up a little too close to the tourist jeeps (Yes, humans are dangerous, children!! Keep away! ) is evidence enough that the distance between us as a species isn’t as great as we believe.

It has been a privilege and a tremendous learning to be a voyeur to this little family drama unfolding in the lives of this very public tigeress and her cubs and I do hope I can follow many more episodes of this story as it continues..

As someone famous once said; “ Some people talk to animals. Not many listen though. That’s the problem.”